Are We Expecting Too Much Too Soon from LeBron James’ New Superteam?

Following a summer of blockbuster signings and game-changing trades, the Cleveland Cavaliers—three superstars in tow and a basketball wizard at the wheel—look better on paper than a briefcase full of Woodrow Wilsons.

Heading into the 2014-15 season, Cleveland’s status as a championship contender is, barring the unforeseen, set in stone.

But given the guff that met the Miami Heat upon James’ arrival four short years ago, it’s worth wondering: Are we expecting too much from the NBA’s newest superteam?

We’re still weeks away from the flood of predictions and power rankings written to ring in the new season. Rest assured, though, that when they hit the Internet newsstands, the Cavs will be covered in conference chalk.

Top to bottom, Cleveland boasts arguably the East’s deepest, most experienced depth chart. The team’s most recent coup: signing Swiss Army knife Shawn Marion to a one-year, veteran’s minimum deal, per USA Today’s Sam Amick.

Scarier still, the Cavs might still have an ace or two up their sleeves:

Fancy a fast glance down Cleveland’s roster, it’s hard not to want to invest heavy in the hype. Until, that is, you recall the growing pains faced by the 2010-11 Miami Heat, those hardwood heavyweights some doubtless believed should’ve been awarded the Larry O’Brien trophy schedule unseen.

Just months after staging what amounted to a preseason championship parade, the Heat staggered to a 9-8 start out of the gate. On the one hand, panicking over an above-.500 start not even a quarter into the season would seem a hyperbolic response.

On the other hand, these were the mighty Miami Heat. LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh weren’t supposed to struggle; they were supposed to strangle.

Just how bad did it get? According to a November 2010 report by ESPN The Magazine’s Chris Broussard, all out mutiny was becoming a real possibility in Miami.

“Right now, in my opinion, no one is doing a good job,” Wade told Broussard. “We’re 9-and-8. We’re all in this together. The players are not doing a good job. The coach is not doing a good job.”

Seldom does such under-the-bus bluntness escape the locker room walls, particularly in an organization so lauded for its all-in-the-family philosophy.

Like Miami coach Erik Spoelstra, Cleveland head coach David Blatt—hired weeks before James’ league-altering decision—faces the unenviable task of being target No. 1 for whatever flak should come the Cavs’ way in the season’s opening days. On a team where the vets have paid their dues in pain and pride, Blatt’s the new guy and will be punished as such should the train fly too far off the rails.

To his credit, Blatt has remained cool as a locker room icepack during his many summer interviews.

“I do feel a great sense of responsibility about that because although I’m not fully one of them, they are all a part of me. I feel responsibility. Pressure? No. I don’t feel pressure,” Blatt told USA Today’s Jeff Zillgitt back in July. “But a lot of responsibility yes and honestly a lot of pride that I was the one who was chosen. I feel like I’ve got to do a good job.”

It’s certainly worth wondering whether the asymmetric weight felt by Spoelstra during Miami’s early struggles—a prelude to four straight trips to the NBA Finals—might serve as a sobering reminder of the perils of rushing to judgment.

If anyone can deflect whatever doubt that’s bound to come Cleveland’s way, it’s James, whose prodigal return is sure to buy him and his comrades some much needed leeway.

Sooner or later, though, all the praise and expectations won’t be worth the pulp it’s printed on if it isn’t accompanied by the beautiful basketball we all know lies in wait—an ether-bound spell waiting for the right mix of thought and action to conjure it in full.

Writing at BusinessInsider.com, Tony Manfred underscores the almost frightening fury Cleveland’s offense holds:

It’s one thing to have a pair of exceptional offensive players on your team. It’s another to have what the Cavs have now — two exceptional offensive players with complementary playing styles.

Love is a nominal power forward who can shoot threes and make enough mid-range shots to keep defenses honest. The LeBron-Love pick-and-roll will be a nightmare, with defenses stuck between keeping LeBron away from the rim and guarding the Love jumper.

Love is basically Chris Bosh if Chris Bosh had a better post game and was a great offensive rebounder. This is a very scary proposition for the rest of the NBA, and that’s even before you get to Kyrie Irving.

The question now becomes whether Cleveland’s cartoonish potential will be grounds for even more caustic pressure or it’s safeguard against a prolonged slump.

Considered as a whole, Cleveland’s lineup boasts more worst-to-first firepower than any of the Heat’s four rosters. The challenge for Blatt is in figuring out which pieces fit where and when, and how to look beyond resumes and bona fides to find the best basketball balance possible.

Then there’s the more pessimistic view, offered by Hardwood Paroxysm’s Steve McPherson, who sees in how the Cavaliers have gone about weaponizing LeBron both the best and the worst aspects of Miami’s approach to team-building:

It’s possible that the Heat’s experience shows that the Cavaliers are making a mistake here, and not just with regard to positions as they neglect the backup point guard and center positions in favor of wings. But it’s also possible that in many ways the path of this next season is already written: a wealth of jaw-dropping moments and victories in the regular season and then a swoon in the playoffs that ends with the Cavs falling short of a title. Whether you deem that a failure or success deferred will depend on how long a view you can take to team building.

That the Cavs might well mimic Miami’s year-one trajectory is certainly plausible. Still, Cleveland’s unique combination of youth, depth and star power makes its mold altogether different. Not better, per se, but different.

Short of missing the playoffs completely, there aren’t many outcomes to Cleveland’s season that would be considered shocking to the basketball-viewing public. Injuries, chemistry, game-to-game plans—all these factors and more contribute to a formula whose ultimate answer has, if you look back far enough, been written before.

Viewed from the dining room floor through the kitchen door, the Cavaliers have all the makings, both homegrown and imported, of a Michelin bistro. Just don’t expect the first few plates to come out flawless.

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Five best hometown sports heroes: LeBron No. 1?

Eddie Johnson ranks the top five hometown sports heroes.

      
 

 

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LeBron accepts ice bucket challenge, nominates Obama

As you’ve probably noticed in all your social media feeds lately (unless you live under a very large rock), the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge is as viral as it gets. The concept is to dump a bucket of ice water over your head, donate some money to ALS research and awareness, then nominate at least three of your friends to do the same to help increase awareness and donations for the deadly disease. The latest athlete to perform the challenge was LeBron James who did so on a boat and he then nominated the President of the United States, Barack Obama (and Kevin Durant).  Will the President do it?   [LeBron James] Article found on: Next Impulse Sports

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Calipari: Couldn’t leave Cats, even for LeBron

The Wildcats head coach said even if he had known LeBron was going to Cleveland, he was staying.

      
 

 

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LeBron James Completes ‘Ice Bucket Challenge’ on a Yacht

Athletes continue to partake in the “Ice Bucket Challenge” to raise money and awareness for ALS research, and Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James has joined in.

On a yacht, James completed the challenge and nominated his two sons, LeBron Jr. and Bryce Maximus, along with President Barack Obama.

The 29-year-old included this caption on his Instagram: “#ALSIceBucketChallenge I accepted the challenge from @brandonweems10 @easymoneysniper @djstephfloss @kevinhart4real. I nominate LeBron Jr, Bryce Maximums and @barackobama.”

On Saturday, the ALS Association announced that it had surpassed $10 million in “Ice Bucket” donations.

[LeBron James]

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Did LeBron James reveal the name of his unborn baby girl on Instagram?

Zhuri.

      
 

 

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How Kyrie Irving Holds the Key to LeBron James’ New Kingdom

A season ago, Kyrie Irving was indisputably the Cleveland Cavaliers‘ best player.

But after the busiest summer in franchise history, he’s faded from headlines and almost instantly became his team’s second or third scoring option. While it’s tempting to believe this will be the season of LeBron James and Kevin Love, we shouldn’t be so quick to overlook what’s sure to be a pivotal role for Irving.

The last time Irving was in the news, he was signing a near-max extension with the organization after averaging 20.8 points and a career-high 6.1 assists per game last season.

Since then, the 22-year-old’s future with the franchise has been overshadowed by two key developments.

First, James announced his return to Cleveland in July after his talents enjoyed four celebrated seasons with the Miami Heat. It was an instant game-changer for a club that spent those four seasons missing the playoffs and undergoing a protracted rebuild.

“At first you were speechless; you couldn’t believe it,” Irving said, according to CBSSports.com’s Ken Berger. “I’ve been watching LeBron for a while now and now that I’m going to be running alongside him and being his point guard, it’s an honor and hopefully we can do great things.”

Second, it’s become all but certain that disaffected Minnesota Timberwolves forward Kevin Love will soon join the Cavaliers.

Earlier in August, Yahoo Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski reported, “The Minnesota Timberwolves have reached an agreement in principle to send All-Star forward Kevin Love to the Cleveland Cavaliers for Andrew Wiggins, Anthony Bennett and a protected 2015 first-round draft pick, league sources told Yahoo Sports.”

Welcome to the charmed life of a franchise that has a four-time MVP on its side.

With all the new firepower, Irving’s production is likely to drop to some degree, along with his ball-handling and playmaking duties. James will often have the ball in his hands instead, and Love immediately becomes Cleveland’s go-to three-point shooter.

Irving becomes a very capable sidekick from the outset, initiating some offense while also seeing increased time off the ball.

As CBSSports.com’s Zach Harper explains, “Irving could be in a similar role as Wade was with James, but we also have to remember this is under [Cavs head coach] David Blatt and not [Heat head coach] Erik Spoelstra. The offensive system could and will likely be different.”

Indeed, Blatt will use elements of the Princeton offense in Cleveland, ensuring that ball and player movement take precedence over isolation-based play.

According to that model, there should be plenty of touches to go around, regardless of the recently incorporated star power.

Nevertheless, Irving should become increasingly comfortable in a catch-and-shoot role. He ranked third among point guards last season with a 27.8 usage rate, and those touches will be fewer and occur more sparingly this season. 

“You do think about [changes] because you’re going to be playing with the greatest player in the game,” Irving told reporters (via ESPN) during Team USA training camp. “I’ve talked to several teammates about how we’re going to have to change our games.”

Irving led the Cavaliers with 17.4 field-goal attempts per game last season. By contrast, James’ sidekick, Dwyane Wade, attempted just 14.1 shots per game—a figure that may be more in line with what Irving can expect going forward.

The parallels with Wade are important, in part because they also hint at how vital Irving will remain to Cleveland’s title chances.

Even with James leading the way for Miami, there were never any doubts about Wade’s importance. Though the 32-year-old’s 19 points per game last season were the lowest since his rookie year, those were also the most efficient points Wade had scored in his 11 seasons. He posted a career-high 54.5 field-goal percentage.

The more perimeter-oriented Irving made just 43 percent of his field-goal attempts last season, and—while he’ll remain an essential three-point threat—there’s plenty of room for the young floor general to become more judicious with his possessions.

He’ll also need to improve his play on the defensive end. James’ presence will help in that regard.

“I think James will have a real impact on Kyrie Irving and Love – if he goes there,” said ESPN analyst Jeff Van Gundy, per Northeast Ohio Media Group’s Tom Reed. “You need a real commitment to defense if you’re going to win (a title). I think James knew that from his time in Cleveland and he certainly knew it from his time in Miami. He will bring that experience and defensive mindset back to Cleveland.”

Van Gundy added, “Defense is about commitment, resolve, discipline and an ability to concentrate. The pressure is going to be exerted by James. He is in his prime and they have a chance to win so as a player you don’t want to not play up to your potential defensively.”

Especially not if you’re Irving, an emerging star who’s yet to prove himself a legitimate two-way presence.

The San Jose Mercury NewsTim Kawakami wrote in June, “Irving might not be the pound-for-pound, minute-for-minute, mistake-for-mistake worst defensive player in the league. He’s assuredly way up there, but probably not Numero Uno.”

Kawakami added, “It takes something special to stand out as a bad defensive player amid all of Irving’s wobbly defensive teammates on the Cavaliers. Yet he keeps doing it.”

Given that Love has received his fair share of criticism on the defensive end, Irving’s work is cut out for him. Cleveland won’t have any difficulty scoring the ball, but it desperately needs James’ defensive prowess to become infectious.

Irving’s individual defense will become an instant barometer signaling whether any osmosis has taken place. Without an improved effort, James’ patience with his young teammate could be tested early and often.

LeBron is once again the face of this franchise, and Love will soon be its second-most accomplished contributor.

But Irving may well determine how quickly the Cavaliers compete for a championship. While he’s no longer the biggest name around town, his critical importance endures.

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LeBron James, New-Look Cavs Offer Difficult Test for Well-Prepared David Blatt

David Blatt‘s first NBA assignment of any kind is to take LeBron James, the league’s biggest name and most powerful player, and a handful of other stars who’ve never set foot in the playoffs, and meld them into an instant champion for a title-starved fanbase and an aggressive, speaks-his-mind (sometimes in Comic Sans) owner.   

Exactly what are the odds that a complete NBA novice can do what Paul Silas and Mike Brown, both well-seasoned in the way the league and its superstars work, could not? What are the biggest challenges Blatt will face in replicating his success overseas? And how well-suited is he for the task?

The Cavaliers did get this part right, according to two NBA players who have played for Blatt: If you were going to pick an overseas coach to stick in this vise-grip of a situation, he’s the one.

“He’s unbelievable,” gushes Los Angeles Clippers guard Jordan Farmar, who played several months under Blatt for Israel’s Maccabi Tel Aviv during the 2011 lockout. “He plays you to your strengths. He’s really open to communication. He’ll be awesome there.”

Josh Childress, who sandwiched two seasons playing for Olympiacos Piraeus in Greece between four-year stints in the NBA, had Blatt as his coach in the Greek League’s All-Star Game.

“Very nice guy and great to play for,” Childress said before leaving for Australia, where he has a one-year deal to play with the Sydney Kings. “He’s extra good at making in-game changes. I only really know him from that All-Star Game, but I’ve heard he’ll do whatever it takes to succeed but is not a my-way-or-the-highway coach.”

As much as Farmar and Childress like Blatt, though, both acknowledged that he faces an array of adjustments. While he has had championship runs in several countries—Israel, Russia, Turkey, Italy—he’s never had to deal with the kind of coach-player dynamic he faces with James.

“It’s much different,” Farmar says. “There are no superstars, no Kobes or LeBrons.”

“If anyone is a star overseas, it’s the coach. “I’d liken it to college,” Childress said. “The coaches are more respected, their voices carry a little further. No one is really bigger than the team. Euro coaches, in general, though, have much more authority and control than NBA coaches do. It’s, ‘This is my show. If this American doesn’t work out, I’ll get another one.’ [Blatt] has coached in enough different countries that he’s experienced his fair share of different situations, but he’s never not been totally in control of his team.”

It’s already pretty clear he won’t have that in Cleveland. James made his decision to rejoin the Cavs without even talking to GM David Griffin or Blatt. In his first turn in the wine-and-gold, owner Dan Gilbert dumped Brown and let GM Danny Ferry go at the mere hint they might be hindrances in James opting to stay.

James has been subtle about it, but several coaching sources say he hasn’t always been the most willing student, especially during his first turn in Cleveland. There were times, one source said, when Brown called for a practice after a long trip and James warned Brown he’d be the only one there.

It wasn’t until he balked at Heat coach Erik Spoelstra’s authority and team president Pat Riley made it clear he had Spoelstra’s back that James was forced to fall in line. He has two championship rings to show for it, of course, but there are those in the NBA who believe one of his motivations for returning to Cleveland is that he tired of the buttoned-up way in which the Miami Heat operate.

Even less established stars such as Kyrie Irving and presumptive Cavs power forward Kevin Love have more security and clout than any European star Blatt, 55, has ever coached.

“His biggest adjustment will be going from being the coach to the coach alongside LeBron,” Childress said.

Maybe. There’s also a matter of dealing with a far more extensive season and travel schedule, as well as a bigger staff to run and responsibilities to the business side of the franchise, such as talking to season-ticket holders and corporate sponsors.

The demands of even the biggest franchises overseas don’t compare to what the coach of the lowliest NBA team must handle. Blatt, unlike other first-year coaches such as Steve Kerr, hasn’t even seen all that secondhand.

At least his experience in Russia should serve him well on the travel front“They have 10- and 15-hour flights over there,” Childress saidand he is expected to lean on 11-year NBA veteran and associate head coach Tyronn Lue to handle the rest-vs.-practice dilemma.

Thanks to a shorter schedule and the monstrous impact winning and losing has on a team’s economic status overseas, Blatt is conditioned to not look beyond the next game.

“You lose three games in a row, it could mean your season,” says Farmar. “The mentality is different. Every game is a must-win.”

While Farmar is confident in Blatt doing his part, he’s less certain about the Cavs‘ personnel—with or without Love—being prepared to reach such lofty goals. Farmar went to the playoffs his first four seasons in the league and won two championships, all with the Lakers. He remembers that exhausting first taste of postseason action, losing to the Phoenix Suns in the first round, as well as the motivation that losing in the Finals the following season to the Celtics provided.

“It’s a different beast,” he says. “You don’t really understand how valuable the chance to win a game is until you’ve experienced that intensity. Losing that first one (to Boston) helped us win the next two. As good as Kevin [Love] is, he hasn’t even played in the playoffs yet. And he’s not the only one. You need a team that understands its roles from top to bottom.”

You also need a coach, of course, who can define those roles and convince each and every player why it is in his best interest to embrace it. Blatt has done that several times overseas, but that is hardly a guarantee he can do it here.

“Overseas it’s much like San Antonio plays: ball and player movement,” Farmar says. “There’s no isolation, no dropping it down to a guy on the block. A lot of what Miami did is the Euro game. LeBron is one of the superstars who plays the right way, but I’m sure [Blatt] will find plenty of ways to get him the ball.”

This could prove to be a stroke of geniusmarrying Blatt‘s diverse and deep knowledge of basketball philosophies with a LeBron whose grasp of the discipline and focus needed to win championships clearly grew in Miami. It’s probably not fair to assume he will return to being more like the LeBron we last saw in Cleveland than the leader he evolved into in Miami.

Then again, it’s also not fair that no matter how or why the Cavs prove successful, LeBron assuredly will be given the lion’s share of credit; and if they aren’t, Blatt assuredly will be the fall guy. Blatt undoubtedly knows that, and with his wife and four kids still in Israel he hasn’t exactly sunk deep roots into Cleveland yet.

That reflects a certain savvy right there. Despite what Las Vegas oddsmakers and LeBron-is-God fans might suppose, Cleveland getting its long-awaited title is a long way from a slam dunk.

Anyone who understands what a franchise must have to win a title wouldn’t even say, at this point, it’s a mid-range jumper. A contested deep three might be more like it. As in: not out of the realm of possibility of going down but hardly a high-percentage play.

Blatt‘s track record would suggest he not only knows how to get a better shot than that but also can make it when he does. His success, though, occurred in foreign lands with mostly foreign players and certainly a foreign power structure. Anyone who speaks more than one language can tell you: Not everything translates.

 

Ric Bucher covers the NBA for Bleacher Report. Follow him on Twitter @RicBucher.

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How Kyrie Irving Holds the Keys to LeBron James’ New Kingdom

A season ago, Kyrie Irving was indisputably the Cleveland Cavaliers‘ best player.

But after the busiest summer in franchise history, he’s faded from headlines and almost instantly became his team’s second or third scoring option. While it’s tempting to believe this will be the season of LeBron James and Kevin Love, we shouldn’t be so quick to overlook what’s sure to be a pivotal role for Irving.

The last time Irving was in the news, he was signing a near-max extension with the organization after averaging 20.8 points and a career-high 6.1 assists per game last season.

Since then, the 22-year-old’s future with the franchise has been overshadowed by two key developments.

First, James announced his return to Cleveland in July after his talents enjoyed four celebrated seasons with the Miami Heat. It was an instant game-changer for a club that spent those four seasons missing the playoffs and undergoing a protracted rebuild.

“At first you were speechless; you couldn’t believe it,” Irving said, according to CBSSports.com’s Ken Berger. “I’ve been watching LeBron for a while now and now that I’m going to be running alongside him and being his point guard, it’s an honor and hopefully we can do great things.”

Second, it’s become all but certain that disaffected Minnesota Timberwolves forward Kevin Love will soon join the Cavaliers.

Earlier in August, Yahoo Sports’ Adrian Wojnarowski reported, “The Minnesota Timberwolves have reached an agreement in principle to send All-Star forward Kevin Love to the Cleveland Cavaliers for Andrew WigginsAnthony Bennett and a protected 2015 first-round draft pick, league sources told Yahoo Sports.”

Welcome to the charmed life of a franchise that has a four-time MVP on its side.

With all the new firepower, Irving’s production is likely to drop to some degree, along with his ball-handling and playmaking duties. James will often have the ball in his hands instead, and Love immediately becomes Cleveland’s go-to three-point shooter.

Irving becomes a very capable sidekick from the outset, initiating some offense while also seeing increased time off the ball.

As CBSSports.com’s Zach Harper explains, “Irving could be in a similar role as Wade was with James, but we also have to remember this is under [Cavs head coach] David Blatt and not [Heat head coach] Erik Spoelstra. The offensive system could and will likely be different.”

Indeed, Blatt will use elements of the Princeton offense in Cleveland, ensuring that ball and player movement take precedent over isolation-based play.

According to that model, there should be plenty of touches to go around, regardless of the recently incorporated star power.

Nevertheless, Irving should become increasingly comfortable in a catch-and-shoot role. He ranked third among point guards last season with a 27.8 usage rate, and those touches will be fewer and farther between this season. 

“You do think about [changes] because you’re going to be playing with the greatest player in the game,” Irving told reporters during Team USA training camp. “I’ve talked to several teammates about how we’re going to have to change our games.”

Irving led the Cavaliers with 17.4 field-goal attempts per game last season. By contrast, James’ sidekick Dwyane Wade attempted just 14.1 shots per game—a figure that may be more in line with what Irving can expect going forward.

The parallels with Wade are important, in part because they also hint at how vital Irving will remain to Cleveland’s title chances.

Even with James leading the way for Miami, there were never any doubts about Wade’s importance. Though the 32-year-old’s 19 points per game last season were the lowest since his rookie year, those were also the most efficient points Wade had scored in his 11 seasons. He posted a career-high 54.5 field-goal percentage.

The more perimeter-oriented Irving made just 43 percent of his field-goal attempts last season, and—while he’ll remain an essential three-point threat—there’s plenty of room for the young floor general to become more judicious with his possessions.

He’ll also need to improve his play on the defensive end. James’ presence will help in that regard.

“I think James will have a real impact on Kyrie Irving and Love – if he goes there,” said ESPN analyst Jeff Van Gundy, per Northeast Ohio Media Group’s Tom Reed. “You need a real commitment to defense if you’re going to win (a title). I think James knew that from his time in Cleveland and he certainly knew it from his time in Miami. He will bring that experience and defensive mindset back to Cleveland.”

Van Gundy added, “Defense is about commitment, resolve, discipline and an ability to concentrate. The pressure is going to be exerted by James. He is in his prime and they have a chance to win so as a player you don’t want to not play up to your potential defensively.”

Especially not if your Irving, an emerging star who’s yet to prove himself a legitimate two-way presence.

The San Jose Mercury NewsTim Kawakami wrote in June, “Irving might not be the pound-for-pound, minute-for-minute, mistake-for-mistake worst defensive player in the league. He’s assuredly way up there, but probably not Numero Uno.”

Kawakami added, “It takes something special to stand out as a bad defensive player amid all of Irving’s wobbly defensive teammates on the Cavaliers. Yet he keeps doing it.”

Given that Love has received his fair share of criticism on the defensive end, Irving’s work is cut out for him. Cleveland won’t have any difficulty scoring the ball, but it desperately needs James’ defensive prowess to become infectious.

Irving’s individual defense will become an instant barometer signaling whether any osmosis has taken place. Absent improved effort, James’ patience with his young teammate could be tested early and often.

LeBron is once again the face of this franchise, and Love will soon be its second-most accomplished contributor.

But Irving may well determine how quickly the Cavaliers compete for a championship. While he’s no longer the biggest name around town, his critical importance endures.

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Did LeBron reveal name of new daughter?

With the summer doldrums in full swing as we await the home stretch of the MLB season, the start of the NFL regular season and NBA and NHL training camps, the announcement by LeBron James revealing his upcoming baby girl’s name qualifies as, uh, news. Kind of. Anyhoo, the King whisked his wife Savannah for […] The post LeBron James takes wife on Greece getaway, reveals name of new daughter (photo) appeared first on Sportress of Blogitude.

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